About the Contributors

Stan Adler is a writer-at-large and has had fiction, poetry, and columns published in numerous publications, both slick and lit. Three chapters from his novel Words for Some Lost Reason, a work in progress, were published in Issue #116 of Evergreen Review. His book The Zen of Selling (1998) is a business cult favorite with a paperback version to be published in spring of 2009.

Jeannette Allée’s work has appeared in The Best American Poetry 2007, The Iowa Review, Fence, FIELD, Gargoyle, Gulf Coast, Green Mountains Review, RHINO, Atlanta Review, and The National Poetry Review. She is a recipient of an Artist Trust grant, a 4Culture grant, and winner of the Richard Hugo New Works Award. She recently completed her poetry manuscript, Eunuchs on Their Lunch Hour.

Paul Amlehn is a writer, painter, vocalist, and filmmaker. His works have been exhibited throughout the world, including at the Venice Biennale, and have been placed in the collections of MoMA and the documenta Archive. He is currently collaborating with musicians: Robert Fripp (King Crimson), Joan Jeanrenaud (The Kronos Quartet), Mike Garson (David Bowie), Erdal Kizilcay (David Bowie), and Jim White (Nick Cave), on an album of his spoken word work. Paul lives in Auckland, New Zealand, with his son Ariel Lorca.

Russell Bittner lives in Brooklyn, NY. His prose, poetry and photography live more sketchily elsewhere, in print and on the 'Net.

Jackie Blackman has a M.Phil in Creative Writing from Trinity College, Dublin. A number of her stories have been published in Phoenix Irish Short Stories, Evergreen Review 109, and Verity Magazine, as well as being performed on RTE radio.

Robin Crane is a twenty-nine year old fiction writer and poet. A Los Angeles native, she currently lives in a cabin in the mountains east of L.A., having recently graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with a Master's of Liberal Arts degree. Poems and short stories of hers have appeared in the Olympia Literary Yarn, Poetry Motel, Poetry Superhighway, All Things Girl, Ghoti Magazine and Newtopia.

Richard Cummings taught comparative Caribbean constitutional law at the University of the West Indies in Barbados. He is the author of The Pied Piper, the play Soccer Moms From Hell, and for Playboy, Lockheed Stock and Two Smoking Barrels. He has recently completed a new novel, Prayers of an Ibo Rabbi, a ghost story about the Ibo slaves who drowned themselves off the coast of St. Simons Island, Georgia. His poetry has appeared in numerous publications.

Steve De France is a widely published poet, playwright and essayist both in America and in Great Britain. He has been nominated for a Pushcart in both 2002 and 2003. In England he won a Reader’s Award in Orbis Magazine for his poem “Hawks.” In the United States he won the Josh Samuels’ Competition (2003) for his poem: “The Man Who Would Love Mermaids.” Some recent publications: The Wallace Stevens Journal, Atlantic: Paris, Amherst Review, The Mid-America Poetry Review. His play The Killer had its world premier at the Garage Theatre in Long Beach, California.

Jeff Encke taught writing and criticism at Columbia University for several years, serving as writer-in-residence for the Program in Narrative Medicine while completing his PhD in English in 2002. He now teaches at Richard Hugo House in Seattle. His poems have appeared in or are forthcoming from American Poetry Review, Barrow Street, Bat City Review, Black Warrior Review, Colorado Review, Fence, Kenyon Review Online, Salt Hill, and Tarpaulin Sky.

Thirty years ago, Henry Edward Fool penned six full-length plays, any one of which, properly folded, might still make an excellent doorstop. More recently he published a book on analog recording, which hit the shelves just in time for the digital explosion to render the greater part of that work utterly useless. Currently Fool slaves away, somewhat sullenly, in a small hotel, while working on a novel, An American Savage in a French Hotel.

David George is a Korean American who lives in Northern California. He graduated from UC Berkeley with a degree in Political Science. Being an avid reader since childhood, he has been writing short stories since he was a teenager. When not writing or reading, David chills out to the music of Gustav Mahler, Elliott Smith and enjoys the company of his dog, Bella.

Robert Gibbons posts new writing every day at his website robertgibbons.net. His fifth full-length book, Travels Inside the Archive, a transcription of the first full year's postings, is forthcoming. Additionally, Bent Sørensen of Aalborg University will translate 60 of Gibbons's prose pieces into Danish. The collection, Jagged Timeline, will be published by Eyecorner Press in Denmark. Robert is Poetry & Fiction Editor of Janus Head.

Karl Taro Greenfeld is the author of four books, including Speed Tribes; Standard Deviations; China Syndrome (a Village Voice and New York Public Library best book of 2006); and the memoir Boy Alone, about his autistic brother Noah, to be published in May by Harper. He is a longtime writer and editor for The Nation, Time, and Sports Illustrated, and former editor-in-chief of Time Asia. His articles and essays have been included in several Best American anthologies, and his fiction has appeared lately in the Paris Review, American Short Fiction, and Asia Literary Review.

Amanda Halkiotis is the middle child of a loud, Greek family that always encouraged her to remain distinct and creative. She lives and works in New York City can be seen at the Bowery Poetry Club most Tuesday nights. Her poetry has most recently appeared online in Spindle Magazine, The Write Place at the Write Time, The Pittsburg Quarterly Review, The Keep Going Online Literary Journal, and the Innisfree Poetry Journal.

Kevin J. Hayes, Professor of English at the University of Central Oklahoma, has written several books, including The Road to Monticello: The Life and Mind of Thomas Jefferson, An American Cycling Odyssey, 1887, and The Library of William Byrd, for which he received the Virginia Library History Award. He is currently working on a book about George Washington’s intellectual life.

Gabrielle Myers recently finished an MA in English at the University of California, Davis. Her publications include poems in Damselfly Press, The Solitary Plover, Caesura, Produce, Art for Autism, and IF Poetry Journal. Now, in addition to reading Bukowski before bed every night, she cooks and grows food in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Valery Oisteanu is a writer and an artist with an international flavor. Born in Russia (1943) and educated in Romania and France, he has adopted Dada and Surrealism as a philosophy of art and life. He is the author of 10 books of poetry, a book of short fiction and a book of essays: The Avant-Gods. For the past 11 years he has been a columnist for NY Arts Magazine, and an art critic for Brooklyn Rail and Artnet. He is also a contributing writer for French, Spanish, Canadian & Romanian art and literary magazines: La Page Blanche, Dart International, Art, Viata Romaneasca, Romania Literara, Altitudini, et al. As a performer Valery Oisteanu is well known to downtown NYC audiences, performing original Zen Dada multi-media shows in his unmistakable style of "Jazzoetry."

satnrose is a sex artist who is forced to use a pseudonym to protect his identity from the Venusians who have sought to abduct him. As 'satnrose' he has been published in the Iconoclast [‘Basquiat Descending a Staircase’], and in his previous incarnation in numerous literary journals and nature magazines.

James L. Smith was born in Rochester, NY in 1972. He moved to Colorado in 1998 where he attended the creative writing program at Colorado State University. While attending CSU, James studied with two-time Colorado Poet Laureate Mary Crow and critically acclaimed poet Laura Mullen. James is a self employed artist and writer currently living in Indianapolis.

Nick Sweet's first novel Gemini Games, published by Janus, was praised by acclaimed authors Andrew O'Hagan, D.M. Thomas, and D.J. Taylor. Other short fictions have appeared in Cutthroat online, Descant, and Black Robert Journal. Nick's second novel, Winter Trees, is due to published by Legend Press. He currently lives in London, where he writes and teaches.

Mike Topp was born in Washington, D.C. He is currently living in New York City unless he has died or moved. Mike's most recent book is Shorts Are Wrong (Autonomedia). He is working on his next book, Sasquatch Stories.

Jesse Weiner is an NYC poet, and the former co-editor/publisher of Salonika. His books include Animadversity (self-published) and The Critique of Language, About These Last and In Harm’s Way (with Victor Asaro), all by Linear Arts. They are all long gone and out of print, but he has a few Mss. ready to go for interested publishers.